The basic purpose of AIMS is the scientific study of human behavior based on accurate measurements. It has the larger, more pragmatic goal of helping individuals plan happier and more successful careers. As individuals are tested, information about their traits becomes the primary source of data for the research program. The knowledge derived from this research benefits AIMS program participants who are making educational and vocational decisions. Complete the registration form and the interest test in the testing information page. Next, call us at (972) 234-8378 to schedule your appointments.

ABOUT AIMS

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AIMS is a nonprofit, tax-exempt research foundation which develops, administers, and interprets aptitude worksamples. Studies show that the mental traits measured by these worksamples are inherited, or else determined so early in life that they do not change significantly after puberty. While the basic purpose of AIMS is the scientific study of human behavior based on accurate measurements, it has the larger, more pragmatic goal of aiding youngsters and adults in planning a happier and more successful future. As individuals are tested, information about their traits becomes the primary source of data for the research program. The knowledge derived from this research benefits AIMS program participants who are making educational and vocational decisions.

Many individuals in today’s society feel dissatisfied and restless because they are in the wrong careers. These “square pegs in round holes” may not recognize their true abilities or may not realize how to use them. When discouraged men and women in their middle years discover their aptitude profiles, they often find that their jobs have failed to challenge their basic abilities. Full satisfaction with a job usually requires a person to flex all his strong mental aptitudes. When natural abilities are not used in one’s occupation, these unused aptitudes are often channeled into counterproductive activities. Years ago a dissatisfied assembly worker with strong communications aptitudes was asked what his hobbies were. His response: “Organizing strikes!”

In this age of specialization and rapid change, it has become crucial for each of us to pinpoint our individual talents and to use this knowledge to pursue satisfying careers and happier lives. The AIMS program helps its participants recognize which vocations will be rewarding outlets for their aptitudes, and it helps them better understand the talents and problems of others in their families and workplaces.

The knowledge of one’s own natural abilities aids in understanding others and in seeing their strengths and weaknesses in a new light. Many workers, particularly those in management positions, view this heightened perception of others as one of the important results of the AIMS program. Parents who take the tests with their children find the discussion of family members’ aptitudes to be the start of new insights into their differences and similarities.

The aptitude worksamples measure an individual’s talent for specific activities by determining how quickly or accurately he can perform certain tasks. These tasks are short samples of work activities involved in the vast majority of occupations. Hence, AIMS calls them “worksamples.” Instead of asking questions to determine knowledge or interests, the AIMS worksamples challenge each examinee to solve problems and to make judgments similar to those involved in many jobs. The results are then compared with those of successful and satisfied individuals in various occupations. This process reduces the overwhelming number of career possibilities to a relatively few specific choices for each examinee. 

These worksamples are not like school or I.Q. tests; there is no pass or fail judgment. A high score on an aptitude worksample is an advantage in some jobs, but a disadvantage in others. Thus, a high score is not necessarily a “good” score and a low score is not necessarily a “bad” score. The goal is not to score high on all of the worksamples, but to discover a satisfying outlet for the examinee’s unique pattern of talents.

The final step in the AIMS program is the presentation of test results and the interpretation of their significance. During the conference, the meaning of each score and the significance of the overall pattern of aptitudes are explained. Occupations that match the aptitude pattern are presented. When appropriate, colleges and college majors are recommended. Each examinee receives a copy of his scores, a report explaining the major recommendations, and a booklet that defines AIMS terminology. Also provided is a USB storage device that contains hundreds of pages of background materials and, when possible, a recording of the conference.

Complete the registration form and the interest test in the testing information page.

Next, call us at (972) 234-8378 to schedule your appointments.